We Had Hoped — For The Past Luke 24:13-35

The past week has been a wild ride.  Some states are going full steam ahead with opening up the economy against the caution that too much too soon will only make things worse.  Crazy and deadly comments (sarcastic or not) were made about injecting disinfectants to get rid of Covid-19.  Protests are happening against stay at home orders.  After a few weeks of staying at home, we are all getting a serious case of cabin fever and as Spring is blooming the fever is only going to get worse.  We want to get back to what life used to be like: full bars and restaurants, sports stadiums filled with cheering fans, hanging out with friends and hair cuts.  There are a few voices that are saying we should just let the Covid-19 chips fall where they may and if it means some folks die as a result that is better than letting the economy tank.  I personally don’t want to believe that we have become that callous, lacking empathy to place money over the value of life.  We might want to hope for a return to what used to be but Covid-19 has happened and the future will be different as social distancing and face masks will be in that future.

The reading for this Sunday out of Luke has two people walking and talking about the events of the past couple days.  They had hoped…they had hoped that a prophet mighty in word and deed…Jesus of Nazareth would redeem Israel.  However their hope had been betrayed by the religious leaders who handed Jesus over to be crucified.  Women carried the news of an empty tomb and angels announcing Jesus was alive, the tomb was empty with no Jesus to be seen.  Hopes were reignited but were once again crushed because it was the third day – it was too late.

The risen Jesus joined them but their eyes were kept from recognizing him.  Despair can do that to us.  We become so focused on what is bad that we can’t see the good.  We become so focused on the unfilled hopes of the past that we can’t see a new future coming into reality.  When Jesus joined them at the table and in the blessing and breaking of the bread their eyes were opened, Jesus disappeared from their presence.  Suddenly eyes focused on unfulfilled hopes were able to recognize a resurrection future.  They ran off to tell others that Jesus was indeed risen and that in the breaking of the bread he and a new hope filled future was revealed to them.

These days we’re hoping to bring back the past.  Our eyes and focus are on what used to be and our frustrations are the result.  There is another reality that invites us to look and see the risen Christ joining us in these days.  The resurrection reveals a new creation (where the death and despair that the likes of Covid -19 bring are no more) that is becoming in Christ and this is our new hope.

This new hope is not for the past nor letting chips fall where they may, but focused on life for the future.  Frustrated because we still must struggle with Covid-19 while hoping for what is to be in Christ?  Absolutely!  So we wear the masks and practice our social distancing because they are defiant acts against Covid-19 and what it represents.  So we protest not to bring back the past but appeal for Christ to bring the future to completion.  Our new vision is for what brings life to our neighbor and world that God so dearly loves.

This new vision is not easy to stay focused on but in breaking of the bread – Holy Communion – we declare a holy love so great that Jesus Christ would die for us.  His resurrection is our life and future.  This holy love lived out in Christ is our hope instead of despair.

Peace.

Resurrection, Doubt and Fear John 20:19-31

A week has now passed since we celebrated Easter behind the closed doors in fear of Covid-19.  Easter was different this year.  It was more introspective.  Without the usual activities surrounding the day and filled churches, we were left to wonder what does the resurrection say to us behind the closed doors?  If we are willing to allow the Spirit to speak in our wondering, we just might discover a greater depth to what we believe and a hope that goes far beyond hurrying to open up the economy and get life back to normal.

On that first day of the resurrection, the Gospel of John tells of the disciples hiding in fear behind closed doors.  They had good reason with fear of Roman soldiers wandering in the streets making sure peace was being kept along with the fear of what will the future hold with Jesus’ crucifixion.  However, earlier in the day Mary Magdalene had told them that she had seen the Lord and passed on the risen Jesus’ words to them.  Perhaps their greatest fear was facing Jesus whom they had abandoned and denied.  Then he appeared, wounds and all.  Their fear was suddenly changed to celebration with Jesus’ words, “Peace be with you!”  The Lord who beat death and was ushering in the reign of God with the start of a new creation appeared to them, not for revenge or to judge but to forgive.  The disciples were sent out by Jesus with the Spirit and a message of forgiveness.

On that first day, Thomas was missing.  Even though he got the news, he wouldn’t believe until he had proof – he wanted to physically inspect the wounds for himself.  A week later he was present when Jesus appeared and this time Jesus gave Thomas the invitation to go ahead and even stick his fingers in the wounds.  Thomas replied, “My Lord and my God!”  I think that we would all like the opportunity for our doubts and fears to be replaced by physical proof and to have God stand before us and announce “Peace.”  What we do have in these days is the witness of others, the belief of parents and friends.  They tell us that God has not abandoned us and this world but has taken on its wounds and death giving forgiveness and life instead.  They show us that the statement “My Lord and my God” is more than a formula to be recited but an intense hope of healing as a new creation is brought into being.

Now we still huddle behind doors for fear of the pandemic.  Now our hopes may be on returning to normal and reopening the economy.  Now we worry about toilet paper shortages, masks and social distancing.  What Easter tells us is that God has shown up in this world and taken on our sickness to bring forgiveness and life instead.  What Easter instills in us is a hope of a new creation healed in Jesus Christ risen.

As Jesus said, “…blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.”

Peace.

Confronted by the Resurrection Matthew 28:1-10

At a time when…

….researchers race to find a vaccine and treatments for Covid-19, we are confronted by the resurrection….

….we still are looking for the first signs that Covid-19 deaths are starting to decline, we are confronted by the resurrection….

….the hot debate is when to open up the economy while not risking a second wave, we are confronted by the resurrection….

….New York is digging a trench to bury the many bodies unclaimed, we are confronted by the resurrection….

….the many mourners are not given the normal opportunity to grieve at the funeral, we are confronted by the resurrection….

….churches are not gathering for worship in buildings filled with Easter lilies, we are confronted by the resurrection….

These past couple months have been anything but normal.  So much of life has changed that we are left with the question is what will the new normal be?  Yet, this Sunday is Easter and this is what the resurrection has done – it changes everything.  We may want to go back to what we consider to be normal but the resurrection confronts us with a new normal.  Our ongoing race for a cure, our mourning and our burying of the dead has come to an abrupt confrontation with the love of God in Jesus Christ.  He entered our death with his cross but his resurrection has opened up life for all creation that death no longer touches.

Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to Jesus’ tomb.  They were doing the normal act of grieving.  Don’t we also approach the grave of a loved one to remember and to grieve their important place in our lives that death has taken away?  Matthew tells us that guards were posted to protect against the “fake news” of Jesus being alive.  Do we really want to have our normal power structures upended by the news of love being stronger than death?  The two Mary’s were confronted by such love as an earthquake opened Jesus’ tomb and an angel told them that Jesus wasn’t there, he was raised from the dead.  They were to go to Galilee where they will see him and along the way the risen Jesus met them.  He told them to tell the disciples and go to Galilee.

A couple important items that Matthew highlights.  The two Mary’s came to the tomb on ‘the first day of the week.’  Creation began on the first day.   The resurrection of Jesus is the beginning of a new creation.  The old ways of pain and grief and dying and Covid-19 will be no more.  They have been confronted by the love of God in Jesus Christ risen.

A second point is the importance of Galilee.  This is where it all started.  Jesus began his work in Galilee where he announced to turn life around because the kingdom of heaven was now at hand.  The same message is for us to hear as well – turn life around because the reign of God bringing life out of death has now begun in Jesus crucified and risen.  So whether we are ready for it or even if we prefer the old normal, the love of God is bringing life out of death.

So in our grieving…our struggle to find a new normal…the race for a cure…worshiping at home online, we are confronted by a love that entered into the old to bring a new creation that will be filled with life.  This good news of the resurrection is what greets us this Sunday.  Jesus Christ be praised!!

Peace.

An Unusual Palm Sunday Matthew 27:11-54

Palm Sunday will be very strange this year.  Instead of waving palm branches and walking into the church while singing, “All Glory Laud and Honor,” we’ll be watching the online version.  Instead of hearing the Lord’s passion read aloud with fellow believers, this too will be done individually online.  The day will definitely be different but if caring for your neighbor’s well being (health) is important, then this is what you do.  Yes, Palm Sunday will not be the same in terms of tradition but the drama unfolding will not change.  On display is humanity’s betrayal, politics, cruelty, attempts to control God and cry for death.  In contrast is the Lord’s outpouring of forgiveness and in response to his death, the whole earth was shaking.

The reading begins with Judas already having betrayed Jesus whom he called “teacher” at the Passover meal (note that all of the other disciples called Jesus, “Lord”).  Peter has denied his relationship with Jesus in the courtyard.  Pilate sits in judgment but he was no political hack.  The crowd was getting unruly so Pilate washed his hands of the events unfolding and declared his innocence.  The crowd wanted a known criminal released and for the blood of Jesus to be on their heads and the heads of their children (notice that Jesus declared at the Passover meal the wine was his blood poured out for the forgiveness of sins). Up to the moment of Jesus taking his last breath was a horrid description of brutality and torture.  Palm Sunday’s unfolding drama showcases just how quickly our voices of praise can be corrupted with shouts for death and political power grabs.

When Jesus died, the Gospel of Matthew records that the earth shook and rocks split apart.  The Temple’s curtain was torn in half.  The curtain served to separate people from God’s holy presence.  The curtain torn apart now declares that nothing stands between us and God.  It also serves as a reminder that God cannot be held behind a barrier, regardless of our foolish ideas.  Matthew tells that saints who had died were raised to life as tombs were opened.  Also, the centurion and others standing guard at the cross declared, “Surely he was the Son of God.”

Palm Sunday is going to be very different this year which will be frustrating from our traditions.  However if you care about your neighbor’s health, this is what you do.  While the day will be different, the story of our Lord’s passion still remains the same.  Despite our claims of innocence, our rebellion, our sin is lived out each day in brutality toward our neighbor and creation.  Jesus’ blood shed on the cross was an act done for the forgiveness of our sin.  The torn curtain declares that God will not be held back from this world…not even by Covid-19.  The earthquake and opened tombs are a vivid declaration that the very foundation of our understanding of life and this world are about to undergo a dramatic change.  Next Sunday, Easter will announce that change.

Peace.

 

A Voice Against Death John 11:1-45

At a time when….

….the cases of Covid-19 (100,000 +) have made the USA the hot spot of the outbreak for the world and continue to rise while medical professionals cry out for supplies and equipment, comes the push to get back to normal for Easter and protect the economy…

….the elderly are considered expendable and should be willing to sacrifice their life for the economy (not a whole lot of support on this from the elderly or those who love their parents and grandparents)….

….the pandemic is declared to be God’s judgment…

….we need to hear a word filled with hope comes the reading for this Sunday from the Gospel of John.  While the above only support death, continued suffering and portray a God of wrath instead of grace, the reading from John tells of Jesus’ presence as the source of life.

Mary and Martha send a message to Jesus that their brother, Lazarus was seriously ill.  Even though Jesus was only about two miles away, he delayed a couple days before coming to them.  When Jesus arrived, emotions were raw because he came too late. Lazarus had been dead for four days to be exact which was significant.  It was considered possible for the soul to return to the body in three days but this was four days.  Lazarus was dead.  Jesus wept with the mourners possibly overcome with their emotion…perhaps seeing the pain of death inflicted…perhaps knowing that the opposition was already seeking ways to get him killed.  The taint of death was unmistakable.  Then Jesus said these amazing words, “”I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.”

The Gospel of John begins telling about the Word which was God and was with God from the very beginning.  The Word which called creation into existence.  Jesus is that Word now standing at the entrance of the tomb calling for Lazarus to come out.  Lazarus came out still wrapped in his burial linens.  Jesus commanded the linens of death to be removed and for Lazarus to be set free.

These days much of life is in crisis.  We worry about economic well being.  We worry about getting sick.  We worry about our loved ones getting sick.  The voices that minimize the risks to others and which tell of sacrificing life to another god (economy) are not voices speaking of life.  They are the voices of politics and power that have the taint of death.  Only one can stand at the door of the tomb and can call for the remnants of death to be removed from us and that is Jesus.

These days look to the one who is ‘the resurrection and the life.’  Listen to Jesus’ call to remove death’s covering.  Care for your neighbor and do what brings them life.  Remember that the Word which gave us life is the same Jesus who died on the cross and rose from the dead.  He is still present calling for us to come out of the ways of death and be set free.

Peace.

Are We Really So Blind? John 9:1-41

The past week has been a wild ride with the Covid-19 leading the way.  Millions of people are in a lock down type situation.  Traveling outside of the country is restricted.  Toilet paper, guns and ammunition are selling out (interesting how these are the items we consider the most critical).  Retired, I haven’t had the guts to look at my investments and savings.  Political leadership has ranged from bold to fault finding, denial and the usual lies.  A few senators have shown an uncanny ability to time the market sell off.  Depending upon your ideology, the virus is a great threat or nothing to worry about in the grand scheme of things.  Conspiracy theories are making unsubstantiated claims about the cause of the pandemic.  Stores and business are closing down to reduce spread of the virus while people are partying on the beaches in Florida (only to increase the spread of the virus when they return home).  So the question for this morning is about blindness and having the sight to recognize the truth and ultimately perceive what God is asking and calling the church to be in these times.

The Gospel reading from John is heavily into the contradictions of light and darkness, blindness and sight.  Jesus gave sight to a man blind from birth.  The disciples wanted to know the cause of the blindness; what sin had he or his parents committed before his birth.  The focus quickly shifted to Jesus and his identity since only God could do this kind of miracle.  The Pharisees got involved because Jesus did this on the Sabbath which made him a sinner.  The healed man was questioned as well as his parents.  Insults were hurled and accusations of being a sinner were made.  The healed man was thrown out of the synagogue and lectured over who he called a sinner.  Jesus came to the man and revealed his identity as ‘Son of Man’ and the man worshiped him.  Pharisees questioned Jesus of their blindness.  He responded, “If you were blind, you would not have sin. But now that you say, “We see,’ your sin remains.

So where does the church and the Gospel begin to fit in all of this?  In the reading, Jesus was revealed as a source of healing as well as the presence of God in the world.  He also drew a line between light and darkness, blindness and sight.  What catches my attention was how the people responded.  Rather than celebrate with the man what Jesus had done for him, they protected power structures and searched for a sin to label and discredit Jesus.

The church is a place where light shines on human darkness.  In the light, truth needs to be held up against the fault finding, disinformation and false conspiracies.  Truth needs to stand against ideology and politics.  Covid-19 is a virus that we need to work together as a nation and world to stop in order to reduce the number of people who will die from it.  Truth is what will allow this to happen.

The church is a place that keeps its sight on Christ who brings healing.  Healing needs to be brought to our divisions.  The focus of healing needs to be brought not just for the well connected but to the weak and powerless.  The biggest sin in the reading was refusing to see Jesus at work.  Today the challenge is to understand that we are called to be different from the world so healing may be allowed to happen and not stifled.

Last week was a wild one.  Next week will be the same.  So let the light of truth be seen.  Keep the focus on Jesus bringing healing into this world.

Peace.

Exposure That Can Heal John 4:5-42

Exposure is the topic for this week.  I’m not writing about being exposed to Covid-19 and precautions.  I am writing about how it has exposed our humanity and fear.  Covid-19 has reminded us once again of our mortality and our lack of invincibility.  High school sports are cancelled.  College sports are cancelled.  Professional sports are cancelled.  Church services are cancelled.  Store shelves are empty.  Scammers are selling their secret cure.  Sales of Corona beer are down as people fear getting the virus from drinking it.  Covid-19 has more than exposed us to a virus.  It has also exposed our humanity and fear.

Today’s reading has Jesus talking to a Samaritan woman at the community well and much was exposed about humanity in that day.  Namely, biases and fear and insecurity.  A God fearing Jew would avoid Samaritan land or find the fastest way through it.  They would not have held a conversation with a Samaritan nor drank water from the same cup.  A man would not have had a conversation with a woman in public.  What Jesus was doing would have raised the anxiety levels of the righteous in those days.  What he was doing also exposed our bias and fear.

There is more.  Jesus asked her to get her husband but she had no husband.  Then Jesus exposed her as having had five husbands.  She wasn’t unlucky in love.  Jesus exposed the insecurity of a woman in a society where wives were easily divorced (discarded) but needed men for protection.

While much was exposed, Jesus offered water but not water that came from the community well.  He offered water that bubbled up like a fountain rising up to eternal life.  He was the source of that water.  Eternal life is a quality and way of life lived out under Christ as Lord in the reign of God.  Jesus brought eternal life to a woman society had built walls around and raised up her dignity in a cast aside culture.  She went off to town to tell others and the Samaritan town believed and welcomed Jesus to stay.  They saw in him the Savior of the world.

The disciples showed up and were aghast that Jesus was talking to a Samaritan woman.  Jesus had come to do the work of bringing eternal life to this world and many others were needed both Jew and Samaritan to be a part of this work.  The eternal life that Jesus brings is a life where biases and fears of others are removed and those cast aside are raised up to dignity as children of God.  For this to happen, a lot of workers are needed.  The disciples needed to understand this.

Covid-19 is a reality that has brought much of the world to a stop.  It needs to be taken seriously.  The prayer is for all infected to quickly recover and know again the goodness of health.  At the same time, our humanity has been exposed with all its fears and insecurities.  This needs healing as well.  The invitation is to join in as one of the workers bringing the water that bubbles over to eternal life.  Jesus is that water.

Peace.

Born Again John 3:1-17

John 3:16 is one of those verses from the Bible that transcends many barriers.  The verse has been called the Gospel in miniature.  It is one of those verses that little children learn in their Sunday school classes.  At an arena or sporting event, you can see the verse on a t-shirt or poster held by a spectator.  The verse does the amazing task of describing God’s endless love for his creation/universe/world that he would send his Son to redeem it back from its darkness and death.

The verse is preceded by a ruler of the Jewish council, Nicodemus, coming to Jesus in the darkness of night most likely to avoid being discovered by others.  Nicodemus had seen and heard in Jesus a quality of life that set him apart as being from God.  Jesus responded that to see the kingdom of God a person needed to be born again which can get really confusing.

Nicodemus was obviously right in that we can’t once again undergo the physical birth process as adults.  So what does being born again mean?  Does it mean an altar call or confession?  Not really, but a confession of faith is the result of this rebirth.  So what is born again?

Jesus went on to describe how this world already stands judged and comes up wanting.  The reality of this is shown in our love of darkness and our effects to hide what we do because deep down we know it is evil.  Simply look at the false information, manipulation of the truth and direct lies being told these days to put our love of darkness on display.

So what are we saying by being born again?  It means we stop our allegiance to the darkness and grab hold of the light which exposes the truth.  The hold that darkness has over us we can’t break; this is the Holy Spirit’s work.  Only the Spirit can make us able to see the truth.  Only the Spirit can allow us to see the reign of God and give us a rebirth from this world into God’s kingdom.

Jesus spoke of his being lifted up (crucifixion).  It was also his exultation.  There the darkness of the world challenged the reign of God.  Jesus’ resurrection (exultation) showed that the light and truth of God’s grace and love are what reign and give life.  John 3:16 tells us that to believe in Jesus is to have eternal life.  Eternal life is more than an endless number of days to live.  Eternal life is a quality of life…a way of life…a life in relationship with the resurrected Lord that is now and continues on forever.  Believing in Jesus is to trust that in him God was saving the world, so deeply loved, from darkness into light.

So we return to John 3:16 and its message.  “For God so loved the world (you) that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”  The Gospel in one sentence.

Peace.

It Is Tempting Matthew 4:1-11

The season of Lent is now here which means that many of us will be giving something up.  At least, for a few weeks.  So we’ll give up social media:  Facebook, Instagram, etc.  We’ll deny ourselves the “vices” like alcohol, fast food or cigarettes.  In the past my big denial was chocolate.  The positive was the effect of losing a couple pounds.  The negative was on Easter morning gorging on the chocolate covered marshmallow bunnies and eggs.  The result was gaining the weight back and sometimes a pound or two more.  The great denial of Lent starts out with good intentions but the lure to return to former ways is strong.  This is how temptation works.  It just keeps pulling and pulling and pulling at our weakness like the taste for sweets, the excitement of how many likes are on Facebook or the social connection at the bar.  Temptation feeds off our fears, anxieties, desires until it has caught us in its trap.

The readings from the first Sunday in Lent are about two great scenes of temptation:  Jesus in the the wilderness, Adam and Eve in the garden.  The temptations were much more that eating an apple from the forbidden tree or turning rocks into bread to fill an empty tummy.  The temptations were really about our relationship with God.

The Old Testament reading is from Genesis 2:15-17; 3:1-7.  The serpent tempts Eve to eat the forbidden fruit while Adam seems to be silent in the background.  The serpent’s challenge is to the goodness of God who denied them the chance to be like God and know good from evil.  Eve and Adam both took a bite; so do we.  Yes we do know what good is because we have come to know evil so well.  The desire to be like God has brought us war, poverty, division, ecological damage to creation. In the end, death comes.

The temptation of Jesus in the wilderness by the devil seems to focus on the devil getting Jesus to do what he shouldn’t but the temptation goes much deeper.  “If you are the Son of God…” is how each temptation begins.  Lets be straight forward.  Jesus knew who he was and the devil knew who Jesus was as well.  What was at stake wasn’t Jesus’ ability to do what the devil tempted but his identity.  Jesus came as God incarnate to save a fallen world.  Would he surrender that identity to fill his empty stomach, force the hand of God to serve him or worship what is evil for the world’s power?  Jesus refused to give in and take a bite from that forbidden fruit.

The first Sunday in Lent seems to be about temptation but really it is about identity.  The verses just prior to Jesus in the wilderness were on his baptism.  The Spirit’s presence and the voice from heaven affirmed his identity, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.”  Baptized into Christ, we are marked with his cross and declared to be a child of God.  While we think temptation is about eating chocolate, the real temptation is to deny our new identity.  Will we deny this identity to claim the place of God?  Will we give up our identity to serve ourselves…get God to serve us…or, serve what is evil for power?  Giving up our identity is temptation’s real goal.

Whether you decide to give up chocolate or Facebook or fast food for Lent is up to you but hold firm to who you are in Christ – a child of God.

Peace.

Are You Hungry? Matthew 17:1-9

[Taken from a sermon to be preached this coming Sunday]

I start out with this opening question, “Are you hungry?”  Right away our minds turn to breakfast, lunch or maybe a quick raid on the leftovers in the refrigerator.  Yet, there are different kinds of hunger beyond food.  If we are sick, the hunger is for healing and health.  The hunger inside might be for peace or justice or truth.  While the word ‘hunger’ can be used to describe the yearning that is inside each of us, this coming Sunday I’ll turn to what can be called the hunger for God.

I am going to ask you the question again but this time it isn’t about food. “Are you hungry?” This time we are looking at a different kind of hunger. The kind of hunger that reaches down into the soul.

Are you hungry to look upon the face of Jesus, the risen Lord?

Are you hungry for the presence of God to be as sure and as obvious as a tent pitched in your backyard?

Are you hungry for the divisions that hurt so deep in society to be removed as the kingdom of heaven brings healing to the nations?

Are you hungry for heaven’s feast…when death has been swallowed up in victory…when you will lift the cup of victory with the ones you have loved…and lost…and miss?

So are you hungry this morning? If the question is about looking upon the face of Christ in glory and for the coming of God’s reign, then the hunger is real and begs to be satisfied. The older you get, the hunger pangs get all the stronger.

This Sunday is Transfiguration Sunday and Lent begins with Ash Wednesday in a couple days. Preaching on this text is really hard because how do you with words tell of a vision that words can’t adequately explain? How do you describe what it would be like to stand next to the likes of Moses and Elijah from the Old Testament? How do you describe with words Christ suddenly glowing with the glory reserved for God alone? How do you describe the voice which said, “This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased; listen to him!” How do you make tangible the touch of Jesus saying, “Get up and do not be afraid.” You can’t. You simply have to be there and experience the moment first hand. What we can do is express the hunger that we share with Peter and James and John. In the end, description isn’t good enough, we want fulfillment.

So this morning we are given a description of a vision that Peter, James and John were blessed to experience. Lets begin by engaging in what the Gospel of Matthew is trying to tell us.

Just prior to this amazing vision on the mountain top, Jesus tells the disciples that he was going to Jerusalem. What was about to happen in Jerusalem was not what they expected, he would be rejected and killed, but in three days he would rise. Peter pulled him aside with the message to stop such talk. Jesus responded with “Get behind me Satan.” He went on to say that if you wanted to have life and be considered a follower of his, you take a cross and die to this world.

We tend to be really tough on Peter then and in the reading today when he wanted to build three booths for Jesus, Moses and Elijah to stay. Shouldn’t he have known better but in reality he was just like the rest of us. He had a hunger that needed to be filled that was instilled as a boy hearing the stories of the glorious past and of a redeemed future brought by the Messiah. Unfortunately he had a hunger but didn’t know fully what the hunger was for. The problem is that we aren’t always sure what we are hungry for either. Haven’t each of us stood in front of an open refrigerator door not knowing what we are hungry for? So it is with faith.

We think the hunger is for political power and exert our will over others. Or, we think it is about celebrity and the biggest church, or how we remember or think life was like fifty years ago. And so we try to fill the hunger but to do so we lie, deceive, con each other, con ourselves and sell our souls. In the end we have nothing, not even life. The hunger instilled in us is not a re-branding or shuffling of the deck in terms of who is in power. The hunger is to look upon the face of God…to feel the touch of Christ and to hear his call to rise and not be afraid…to live in a world pulsating with God’s justice and peace.

Matthew then moves to the voice which speaks from the cloud saying, “This is my Son, the Beloved listen to him!” The voice from the cloud announced, “this is my Son, the Beloved” which is much like what was announced at his baptism. This time the voice said something more, “listen to him.” Just after the amazing vision on the mountain top, Jesus was going down the mountain and gave the three disciples a stern warning to keep this quiet until he was raised from death. The very presence of God for which we hunger the most is sandwiched between Jesus’ announcement that he was going to die and rise from the dead.

The hunger that runs so deep in the soul is satisfied only by the love of God in Christ who emptied himself out on the cross for us…satisfied only by the resurrection where the power of death is no more.

So we return to the opening question about being hungry.  There is a meal for the people hungry for God.  It is called Holy Communion.  We are fed looking forward to the day when all hunger is gone.

Do not be afraid, this is the body of Christ given for you.

Do not be afraid, this is the blood of Christ shed for you.

A foretaste of the feast to come when we raise the cup of victory with those we have loved and lost and miss.

A day when all the lies and deceit and division and abuse will have come to their end in the cross of Christ. A new creation will be free in the resurrection.

So are you hungry? Then come, come to God’s Holy Table this coming Sunday in anticipation of the day when the hunger is no more.

Peace.

 

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